The Videogame Oscars – The Nominees

There are plenty of awards for the video game industry, but I want to approach this from a different angle. Much like how the Oscars rewards movies for their artistic merit, I want to honour games in the same way. Along with a team of the most esteemed gamers I could find (within walking distance), I’ve put together a list of nominations for the most artistic games of the decade. These nominations aren’t based on just graphics or gameplay, but also storyline, acting and creativity. I need YOUR help to decide the winners. Yes, YOU, anonymous blog reader! Screw the Academy, we’re the Academy of gaming. Simply click the link below and make your choice or even make your own nominations! Feel free to check out these videos of the nominees to help make your decision.

Click here to vote!

And the nominees are …

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Yaani Fisher as Riley – The Last of Us: Left Behind

Ellen McLain as Glados – Portal 2

Merle Dandridge as Alyx Vance – Half Life 2

Mark Hamill as The Joker – Batman: Arkham City

Stephen Merchant as Wheatley – Portal 2

Best Actor in a Leading Role:

Ashley Johnson as Ellie in The Last of Us

Courtnee Draper as Elizabeth in Bioshock Infinite

Nolan North as Nathan Drake – Uncharted 3

Troy Baker as Joel – The Last of Us

Rob Wiethoff as John Marston – Red Dead Redemption

Best Developer:

Naughty Dog – The Uncharted series, The Last of Us

Bungie Studios – The Halo series, Destiny

Irrational Games – Bioshock, Bioshock Infinite

Rockstar Games – The GTA series, Red Dead Redemption

Valve – The Half Life series, the Portal series

Tell Tale Games – Fables: The Wolf Among Us, The Walking Dead

Rocksteady Studios – The Arkham series

Best Game:

The Last of Us

Uncharted 3

Bioshock Infinite

Arkham City

Portal 2

Half life 2

Red Dead Redemption

Shadow of the Colossus

Results to come this week!

Female Representation in Gaming: Why GamerGate can change it for the better

It’s been a whirlwind couple of months as the GamerGate debacle has morphed into a beast that I don’t think any of us quite foresaw. Depending on your point of view, it’s done a lot of good, a lot of bad or both. But it’s undeniable that it’s cast a lot of light and a lot of mainstream attention onto issues within the gaming community that though they might not have been the initial intention of the movement, are still important issues nonetheless and issues that have been quite prominent with other artistic mediums. One such issue is that of sexism within gaming, though at this stage, I don’t want to focus on the issue of female gamers and how they are treated or represented. That’s another important issue for another time. What I want to focus on is the representation of female characters within video games.

Film has long struggled with the idea of prominently featuring female characters and for a while, the film community and the general public has been wrapped up with the idea of “strong female characters”, without realising that this was a fallacy in itself (when’s the last time someone’s called for a “strong male character?) and became a trope that allowed for bland, stereotypical representations. We don’t want “strong female characters”, we want good ones. It’s a trap that the video game industry has fallen into more often than not. There’s been a lot of bad with female representation in gaming, especially considering that the primary audience for a long time has been young adult males. There’s been a lot of over sexualisation and a lot of bland female characters that exist solely as accessories for the male protagonist. Even female protagonists such as Lara Croft were by and large devoid of personality and hyper sexualised. But fear not loyal reader, things HAVE been improving.

In recent years, there have been a number of female characters who are not just some of the most complex, compelling and endearing characters in gaming, but in recent fiction in general. Characters like Ellie from the Last of Us and Elizabeth from Bioshock are characters who have their own motivations, strengths, weaknesses, fears, aspirations, emotional nuances and character journeys. They’re strong but also vulnerable, they have their own important place and arc within the story and do not exist solely to provide support or emotional baggage for the male protagonist. Even characters like Lara Croft have been given a major update. Croft now has an actual personality besides being an unstoppable bad ass. She’s an actual character now and that’s wonderful. As games become more recognised as art, things are improving at a rapid pace. It’s no coincidence that some of the most artistic games in the last few years are the ones with this kind of diverse and effective representation. That’s not to say there’s not still bad with the good, but female representation is certainly evolving and it’s on the upswing.

Which is why all of this debate and controversy brought about inadvertently by GamerGate and the criticism of sexism is a good thing. Art is ever changing and art is controversial. This debate gets eyes on the issue in both the mainstream and from developers and players. It can shine light on the good that has happened and also the issues that still need to be improved. Sure, things might get ugly, but you can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs.

Depression Quest: Forget the Controversy and GamerGate. Is it art?

There’s been a lot of ugliness surrounding this game and its creator due to all of this GamerGate controversy. But there’s a million voices already sounding off on that debate and that’s not what I want to address in this blog. Sometimes when we get all caught up in social and cultural rhetoric, we forget to look at the games themselves.

Depression Quest was released in 2013 and has split the gaming community down the middle. Some reviews have been overwhelmingly positive with gaming critics leaping to praise it, while others have been crushingly negative with many not even considering it a game at all. Zoe Quinn created Depression Quest as a way to tackle the subject of depression head on and try to build understanding of the issue through an interactive narrative. The player is presented with descriptions of a variety of situations and decisions to make based on those descriptions which lead to five different endings. These are constructed in a way that attempts to bridge the gap between sufferers of depression and those who have never experienced the affliction before by putting them in a depression sufferers shoes. The decisions they are faced with are often illogical and often aren’t decisions at all, as many options are crossed off depending on prior decisions made. This is supposed to convey the idea that depression often robs the sufferer of choice. It’s a very clever narrative device and one that can only be done through gaming.

Many have said that it is not a game. They have criticised Depression Quest for being boring, repetitive, unintuitive and just an all around poor gaming experience. In many ways, they are right. This is gaming used as a social tool, gaming used as education rather than entertainment. It’s making a statement and all of the GamerGate ugliness aside, it’s trying to use the medium in a creative way to try to instigate positive change and alter perceptions. If that’s not art, I don’t know what is.

Art affects people, art changes perceptions and makes a statement about culture or life in a creative way. Depression Quest does this in a way that only a game can. Is it perfect? Certainly not. It’s rudimentary, clunky and  downright clumsy at times. But it’s bold and it’s different. For gaming to move forward as a medium and be recognised as a legitimate art form, this type of experimentation is welcome and needed. The hardcore games will always be around, but there’s certainly room for this sort of experimentation and I’m excited to see more in the future.

Why Bioshock Infinite is Art

BIOSHOCK INFINITE

Welcome to Painting with Pixels! Each week, I’ll be picking apart exceptional games to show you why this newborn storytelling medium has evolved from a trivial pursuit to a legitimate art form much like the film or the novel. This week is all about the subversive and utterly mind bending shooter, Bioshock Infinite. This is the tale of a city in the sky where a furious and brutal civil war brews beneath the calm, cloud lined exterior. But is it art? Let’s find out. WARNING: MAJOR SPOILERS FOR BIOSHOCK INFINITE FOLLOW

WELCOME TO COLUMBIA

Bioshock Infinite takes revisionist history to a whole new level as they thrust you into the midst of colonial America. But it is an America very different to the one we know from the history books. You play Booker DeWitt, a  gruff gun for hire desperate to pay his debt. To do this, he must venture to the floating city of Columbia, a civilisation isolated from the ground bound America by its religious and fanatical leader, Zachary Comstock.  Booker is tasked with finding a girl named Elizabeth and together, they must try to escape Columbia as it is torn apart from the inside out by a war between the white upper class and the Vox Populi, a revolutionist civil rights movement so zealous that even Malcolm X might have taken pause. There are a hundred things I can talk about that make Bioshock Infinite great. The stunning, hauntingly beautiful setting. The multilayered, emotionally nuanced and morally ambiguous characters. The fast paced, frantic and exhilarating gameplay. But what I want to focus on is what makes the game stand out: The way Biotic Infinite makes full use of the medium of gaming to tell its story in a way that simply cannot be done through any other medium.

Constants and Variables

At several points in the game, an odd couple will appear, seemingly out of nowhere and will offer you a series of choices. Heads or tails – the bird or the cage. Bioshock Infinite is more than anything about choice. This is where the BIG spoilers start, so read ahead if you dare.

Elizabeth has the ability to open “tears”. These are portals into parallel universes – some, almost exactly the same while others radically different. For every choice one makes, there exists a different universe – an endless number of variations – an “infinite” number of universes. In each universe, there exists variables. For example, a man being dead in one or alive in another. But there also exists constants. Things that must happen and will always happen within each universe. Early in the game, the Luteces wonder whether Booker will row a boat. He doesn’t and they remark that “He doesn’t row”. After a pause, they realise that “He doesn’t row“. It’s a puzzling line but comes together once the parallel universes are revealed. In that instance, across all universes, Booker will never choose to row.

This is a commentary on gaming as a medium. Even in games, that give you the option of variables – choices you can make, things you can change each time you play through it – there will always be constants. More often than not, whatever choices you make will lead to the same outcome.The Luteces approach you again and present you with a choice – heads or tails. No matter which one you pick, the outcome will be the same. No matter which outcome you pick, the game will end in the same way.

On this same vein, they give you the opportunity to choose between two pendants: a bird which represents wild, unrestricted freedom and a cage which represents control, safety and security. It doesn’t make a difference which you choose and there’s no real impact on the story or the ending. There’s a reason for that. These represent the two conflicting ideologies presented by the extreme political leaders of Columbia: The all powerful, all controlling dictator, Zachary Comstock and the violent militia leader, Daisy Fitzroy. You clash horns with both sides as they vie for control of Columbia, cutting a bloody swathe through the populace as they do so.

As both groups commit seemingly try to outdo one another with the atrocities they commit, Booker, Elizabeth and the player themselves finally come to the realisation that it doesn’t matter which side is chosen: they’re both as and as the other. The dictatorship of Comstock was cruel, racist and made life a living hell for those who he deemed as unworthy of God’s grace. But Fitzroy’s revolution resulted in total anarchy, bringing out the worst in people as they revelled in the violence they were free to commit. The bird or the cage, it didn’t matter which one because both resulted in death and misery.

It’s an illusion of choice, an illusion of freedom. You control the characters, but really, you don’t. They will always end up in the same place, no matter how many times you play. The game asks the question of the player: Are we bound to our fate? Do choices matter in the long run if we all end up in the same place? It’s heavy stuff and more than a little morbid.

But after playing the game through,  one may realise that even if they’re bound to the same track – it’s still one hell of a ride.

Have you guys played Bioshock Infinite? What did you guys think? Are there any other games you want me to take a look at? Let me know in the comments below!